Prisoner

Annika Martin; Skye Warren
Prisoner
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Publisher
Skye Warren & Annika Martin
Release Date
October 2014
ISBN
1940518180
Series
Book 1 of Criminals and Captives
Genre
Contemporary Romance, Erotic Romance, New Adult

SUMMARY
He seethes with raw power the first time I see him--pure menace and rippling muscles in shackles. He's dangerous. He's wild. He's the most beautiful thing I've ever seen.

So I hide behind my prim glasses and my book like I always do, because I have secrets too. Then he shows up in the prison writing class I have to teach, and he blows me away with his honesty. He tells me secrets in his stories, and it's getting harder to hide mine. I shiver when he gets too close, with only the cuffs and the bars and the guards holding him back. At night I can't stop thinking about him in his cell.

But that's the thing about an animal in a cage--you never know when he'll bite. He might use you to escape. He might even pull you into a forest and hold a hand over your mouth so you can't call for the cops. He might make you come so hard, you can't think.

And you might crave him more than your next breath.

Book Review by Pip (reviewer)
Jan 30, 2018   [ OFFICIAL REVIEW ]
43 people found the following review helpful
There are some books—rare as they are—that make me question the definition of romance and by extension, why I read them. PRISONER is one of those rare few books, which makes this a near-impossible review to write. If I read romance for escapism and a HEA that is only fulfilled in fiction and unrealistic, it's probably because I've been so conditioned towards carrying "real-life" cynicism like a straw that breaks the camel's back that it can be difficult to buy a certain pairing's happiness. Then there are some books that tip the fairytale on its head, where the villain never even becomes an anti-hero that you think you can root for, though there are those who glory in the grey areas of morality and insist that this is as good a love story that you can get.

I'm torn, really. My suspension of belief has never been called into question more than when I was going through the more excruciating parts of this story. As clearly as I do recognise that PRISONER doesn't fit in any of the contemporary romance category that I'm used to, that the effectiveness of the story is so dependent on us readers trying to separate reality from fiction is what makes me uncomfortable. Because for many of us, reality isn't—and shouldn't—be that way and to buy wholly into Abigail's and Grayson's tale of lust and dark need, is akin to going against that I accept in my own "normalised" world that isn't about the microbalance of power in relationships or about living on the wrong side of the law and making do or even reveling in it.

Roughness, dubious consent and violence are par for the course, as are the lack of apologies for male behaviour that is overtly unkind and possessive, then mansplained away in a twisted kind of reverse psychology that I sometimes have trouble buying. We're reminded often by both Grayson and Abigail that the former is a man beyond redemption—that steeped he is in his life of crime after the abuse he suffered in his early years.

One of my issues is that Abigail's fighting spirit is what turns Grayson on, yet it also seems to show her as the weaker, cowering vessel with more than a hint of being steeped deeply in Stockholm Syndrome, because attraction and lust surely can't trump fear and hate? In PRISONER, that happens. These toxic emotions intermingle, with more than a tinge of the delusional thrown in. But both author try to show up the similarities between Grayson and Abigail despite their outward differences and that's where they find common ground: in the muddied waters of screwed-up life experiences and the apparent beauty that can be found in cruelty and compassion. Love isn't all sunshine and roses, but rather, the man who overcomes a cop to rescue you in a jail cell because you belong to him.

Once again, I need to remind myself that this isn't reality and because it's a fictional book that I willingly chose to read, my tolerance level of this deviance must naturally be higher of what I'd be raising the alarm for in real life. After a while, enjoyment gives way to the conscious act of overriding my own instincts about romance; or maybe it's just showing me up as a prude.
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July 16, 2018 08:20 PM ( EST )