Ocean Light

Nalini Singh
Ocean Light
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Publisher
Berkely
Release Date
June 2018
ISBN
9781101987827
Series
Book 2 of Psy-Changeling Trinity
Genre
Paranormal Romance

SUMMARY
New York Times bestselling author Nalini Singh dives beneath the surface of her Psy-Changeling world into a story of passionate devotion and selfless love…

Security specialist Bowen Knight has come back from the dead. But there's a ticking time bomb in his head: a chip implanted to block telepathic interference that could fail at any moment—taking his brain along with it. With no time to waste, he should be back on land helping the Human Alliance. Instead, he's at the bottom of the ocean, consumed with an enigmatic changeling…

Kaia Luna may have traded in science for being a chef, but she won't hide the facts of Bo's condition from him or herself. She's suffered too much loss in her life to fall prey to the dangerous charm of a human who is a dead man walking. And she carries a devastating secret Bo could never imagine…

But when Kaia is taken by those who mean her deadly harm, all bets are off. Bo will do anything to get her back—even if it means striking a devil's bargain and giving up his mind to the enemy…

Book Review by Pip (reviewer)
May 07, 2018   [ OFFICIAL REVIEW ]
16 people found the following review helpful
I've always had a soft spot for Bowen Knight, even loved his cause and his unwavering, determined fight for humanity in the Human Alliance (guess which one I belong to?)--the least of the three races it seems, in Nalini Singh's Psy-Changeling world. My heart sank when Bo went down hard in Silver Silence and just as I thought all hope was lost, OCEAN LIGHT became my own (and Bo's) salvation. This was the book I've always wanted ever since Bowen burst onto the scene, from the moment I learned that he had an immovable but lethal chip in his head about to detonate any time.

That Ms. Singh chooses to introduce Blacksea using Bowen's story is an obvious shift away from the Bear changelings in Silver Silence, a mysterious group hinted at in the closing books of "season 1" of her Psy-Changeling novels that focused solely on the cats and the wolves. Here, Ms. Singh opens yet again new pathways and original insights into her massive world-building that continues now deep down in the sea, so compelling in ways that it's hard to turn away from the myriad of sea creatures and their personalities that populate this book. Half the book however, after the intriguing setup, comprises Ms. Singh's languid, thorough exploration of the world Bo has found himself in, not least the slow unfurling and the slow romance between him and Kaia, before the pace picks up frantically again towards the end.

Written into Kaia Luna's and Bowen Knight's attraction is a conflict that's drawn up against these lines: the bad blood between the humans the Blacksea changelings rather than just a personal feud that Kaia sets up against Bowen for the losses that she feels keenly in her life. Enemies-to-lovers in this context might just seem a little too dismissive after all, too small a view to take in the huge world that Ms. Singh has written, though this is still a trope nonetheless, in romantic fiction which I like a lot.

Yet Kaia, a scientist-turned-cook (with maternal instincts and a soft, easily hurt heart that's prone more to pulling away) in the Ryujin BlackSea Station, is the last person I'd expect Ms. Singh to pair with the hard security chief, who is as ruthless and emotionless as the Psy themselves without the telekinetic power. Coupled with the (somewhat unbelievable) bit of instalove written into a strong attraction--cue bodies hardening, arousal flaring--that strikes the both of them at first glance is perhaps also an attempt to humanise the hard-nosed image of Bowen Knight who is more a man of flesh and emotions more similar to the other alpha changelings than we think. I would have loved a stronger, harder, a more sword-wielding-type mate for Bo—the type that would have stood for his fight in the Human Alliance by his side with a weapon--but clearly this is my personal preference speaking for such heroines to materialise every time.

OCEAN LIGHT is satisfying on many levels, but I particularly loved the introduction to the Blacksea changelings and Bowen's Knights. The threads of this incredibly complex arc that Ms. Singh has written are far from tied up, nonetheless. There are still too many unrevealed secrets here--things that Ms. Singh doesn't choose to reveal--that baby steps seem to be the only way in which this juggernaut of a story can move on, which is both as rewarding and as frustrating at times.
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July 20, 2018 10:45 PM ( EST )